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Security tips — Facebook Privacy Awareness Week 2016

Transcript

Participant 1: I found a website the other day that tests how long it takes for a hacker to hack your password, which was terrifying and I put one of mine in and it was like, 3 hours and the other one was 4 years, thank God. Is there any way for us, as in, Facebook users, to test how secure our accounts are?

Facilitator: A strong password is really helpful and then also going into the security settings and there are these advanced security settings that you can turn on. So one is login notifications, so you regularly log in from Sydney and then somebody logs in from London to your account, or tries to, we’ll automatically send you a notice and say “Hey, is this you?” And the second one is that you get a code on your phone, and you can only log in if you’ve got the code on your phone. So those ones give you just a little bit more protection. With the passwords as well, I would also suggest that don’t have the same password across your most important accounts, because if you have the same password on your email and your Facebook for example, the hacker will often, they get into one and then they go, “Okay, I’ll see what other ones that are connected to this account,” and often the recovery email is going to be sent to your email address, and so if your email is compromised, you’re going to have a very difficult time trying to get back in.

Timothy Pilgrim: There’s different ways you can protect the information: there’s two-factor authentication which can be used in certain situations, financial institutions, banks will use that often when you need to access your account online or you want to make a payment online. But it comes down to having really, really strong passwords and changing them frequently.

Participant 2: As well as keeping an eye on your own security and privacy, like keep an eye out for your friends. And if you think that a friend of yours has maybe been hacked, really try to verify with them that it’s them, by, perhaps like asking them a personal question that only they’ll know the answer to. Just to make sure that everybody is safe and secure.

Timothy Pilgrim: Certainly our office is keen to ensure and try and get information out to people to look after their privacy, and our website, which is oaic.gov.au, we have a lot of information on. And at the end of the day, think about yourselves and your personal information, and also think about the personal information of your friends and how that needs to be protected too because it’s actually a group activity to look after our personal information and keep an eye out for each other. 

In this series: Facebook Privacy Awareness Week 2016

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